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The Facebook engineer who wrote a controversial memo decrying the company's 'intolerant' culture is leaving (FB)

The Facebook engineer who wrote a memo decrying what he called the company's "intolerant" liberal culture has quit. Brian Amerige sparked a firestorm at Facebook when he attacked the company's "political monoculture." In a memo to his colleagues on Wednesday, seen by Business Insider, he said he "disagree[s] too strongly with where we're heading on these issues to watch what happens next."

Brian Amerige, the Facebook engineer who sparked a firestorm at Facebook with his criticism of what he called a "political monoculture" that is "intolerant" of conservatism, is leaving the company.

In an internal message to fellow employees on Wednesday, Amerige wrote: "These problems can be solved — just not by me, not any more, at least. I care too deeply about our role in supporting free expression and intellectual diversity to even whole-heartedly attempt the product stuff anymore, and that's how I know it's time to go."


Over a million people asked Amazon's Alexa to marry them in 2017 and it turned them all down (AMZN)

Amazon says that more than 1 million people in 2017 asked their Alexa-powered devices to marry them. Spoiler alert: Alexa is going to reject your marriage proposal. A lot of consumers confide in their virtual voice assistants with more personal information, leading developers to hone in their AI's personalities and make them more conversational.

People really love their virtual assistants — so much so, in fact, that over a million people asked Amazon Alexa to marry them in 2017 alone, the retailer confirmed to Business Insider.

And that's not even including customers who might have proposed to their Google Assistant, or Apple Siri, or Microsoft Cortana. It seems that more than a handful of the 


Tesla gave employees new confidentiality agreements after internal emails were leaked to the media: Report (TSLA)

Tesla drafted new confidentiality agreements after the contents of internal emails from CEO Elon Musk to employees were included in 2016 articles by Bloomberg and CNN, Bloomberg reports.

Tesla legal vice president Jonathan Chang reportedly testified on Wednesday in a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) hearing that the automaker's general counsel told him to write new confidentiality agreement for employees in order to "have them renew their vows."

Tesla did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

 


The 5 hottest tech stocks saw a staggering $172 billion of market value go up in smoke on Wednesday (AMZN, FB, AAPL, GOOGL, NFLX)

The stock market decline Wednesday hit the biggest tech stocks particularly hard. Together, the FAANG companies — Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, and Google — lost a collective $172 billion in value. Amazon was the biggest loser; it shed $56 billion in market capitalization.

The stock market took a big bite out of the FAANGs on Wednesday.

Collectively, the Big Five tech firms — Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, and Google — lost $172 billion in value over the span of a few hours on Wednesday,


A Google linked exec and a former US politician have dropped out of a Saudi project after journalist's disappearance

Members of an advisory board for a $500 billion Saudi megacity project are distancing themselves from the organisation after the reported murder of a dissident Saudi journalist. Google-linked executive Dan Doctoroff and ex-US secretary of energy Ernest Moriz have now dropped out of the project. Apple's Jony Ive was initially on the list, but Apple says his inclusion was a mistake and he has nothing to do with the project. The other 16 members of the board did not respond to Business Insider's multiple requests for comment.

A senior executive who works for Google's parent company and a former US secretary of energy have dropped out of a Saudi Arabia tech and business advisory board following international outcry over the disappearance and alleged murder of a dissident Saudi journalist. 

On Tuesday, the 


The 7 biggest changes to Google's Pixel 3 that make it better than last year's Pixel 2

Just like Apple and Samsung, Google now has a brand-new phone every year. Two years ago, it was the Google Pixel. Last year, the Pixel 2 arrived.

And this year, in 2018, the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL are the Next Big Thing.

You may be left wondering: What's different from last year's model? How much difference could 12 months make?

The answer, it turns out, is more substantial than you might imagine. 

1. Yes, the notch. Unfortunately yes. But it's only one of the Pixel models that has the notch.

Depending on how you feel about phones with notches — like the iPhone X, and many imitators since — the new design of the Pixel 3 XL may be a plus or a minus. 


Walmart looked at buying buzzy luggage brand Away — and it could be part of its plan to become the Netflix of retail

Walmart has looked at acquiring New York-based luggage startup Away.  In the past few years, Walmart has bought up a string of smaller consumer companies in a quest to become the "Netflix of e-commerce" — and a direct competitor with Amazon.  Multiple people said that Walmart has taken meetings with many successful direct-to-consumer startups in recent months as part of the retail giant's plan to buy up more "digitally native, vertically intergrated" startups.

Walmart looked at acquiring luggage maker Away and held several meetings with the startup, Business Insider has learned. It's unclear if the talks are still ongoing. 


Square's CFO is leaving to be CEO of Nextdoor — read Jack Dorsey's heartfelt note to mark her departure (SQ)

Square's CFO, Sarah Friar, is leaving the company to join Nextdoor as CEO. Friar first joined Square in 2012 and led the company through its 2015 IPO. Her decision left CEO Jack Dorsey both happy and sad, he said in a heartfelt memo shared on Twitter — adding that he always thought they'd run Square together into their late 90s. The stock went down over 9% in after-hours trading.

Square Chief Financial Officer Sarah Friar is leaving the $32 billion payments company to take a new role leading neighborhood social network Nextdoor as CEO.

Friar, who first joined Square in 2012, led the company through its initial public offering in 2015. She'll stay at the company through December. 

“These past six years at Square have been an incredible journey,” Friar said in a statement. “It is rare to work at a company that aligns such a meaningful purpose with unbounded market opportunity."


A DNA test offered by Albertsons claims to tell you which antidepressant is best for you, but scientists say it’s not worth the money

Several companies make DNA tests that claim to tell you how well you'll respond to certain antidepressants based on your genetic profile. Two personalized medicine companies — Assurex and Genomind — offer some of the most popular tests and work with physicians and pharmacists to provide them to patients. A chain of Albertsons pharmacies in Chicago, Philadelphia, and Boise is running a pilot program in which pharmacists can offer the Genomind test. Silicon Valley genetics testing startup Color Genomics recently began offering a similar test as part of its services. The costs of the tests range from $250 to $750, but some scientists say it's not worth the money. 

Around the time that 26-year-old Courtney Luk got in line at the pharmacy to pick up her 25th depression medication, she decided she'd had enough.


Microsoft will let anyone use 60,000 of its key software patents as it moves to play more nicely with open source developers (MSFT)

Microsoft is joining the Open Invention Network (OIN), a patent community that protects Linux and other open source software programs. The company acknowledged this decision may be viewed as a surprise, as Microsoft had a long history of competing with open-source initiatives and making billions from its patents. Microsoft has embraced open source initiatives in more recent years and plans to bring 60,000 patents to OIN.

Microsoft announced today that it’s joining the Open Invention Network (OIN), an open-source patent community — basically, allowing anybody to use some 60,000 software patents that the tech titan holds, without having to pay any kind of licensing fee. 

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