Skip to main content
There are hundreds of Confederate monuments across the US — here's when they were built

After violence at a white supremacist rally led to the death of three people in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 12, a growing number of cities and civilians have started tearing down Confederate monuments across the United States.


The 5 best new songs you can stream right now, from the likes of Led Zeppelin's Robert Plant and Grizzly Bear

This week, Led Zeppelin's Robert Plant and LCD Soundsystem both released new singles, and Grizzly Bear put out one of the year's best albums.

Grizzly Bear — "Aquarian"

Grizzly Bear's Daniel Rossen sings ominously of "great disaster" amid a tempestuous swirl of electric guitars on "Aquarian," a highlight from the indie-rock band's masterful new LP, "Painted Ruins."

 

 

LCD Soundsystem — "tonite"

LCD Soundsystem singer James Murphy paces and rant-sings through a vocoder about the state of the music industry in the video for "tonite," an '80s-inspired synth anthem from the group's upcoming album, "American Dream."

Youtube Embed:http://www.youtube.com/embed/lqq3BtGrpU8Width: 800pxHeight: 400px

KMD — "True Lightyears" (feat. DOOM and Jay Electronica)

How to quit smoking, according to scientists
Posted August 18, 2017 6:16 PM
How to quit smoking, according to scientists

It's not easy to quit smoking.

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death. But by some estimates, it could take as many as 30 tries to quit. 

In July, the FDA came out with plans to limit the amount of nicotine in cigarettes, with the aim of not making them addictive. The news sent tobacco stocks falling. Researchers have speculated that cutting nicotine levels could make it easier for smokers to quit, and keep new smokers from getting addicted. 


Trump's allies on the far right prepare for war with the White House following Bannon's departure

President Donald Trump's allies in the far-right media have expressed disappointment at the departure of White House chief strategist Steve Bannon on Friday, but speculate that it's likely not the end of Bannon's attempts to pressure the administration to implement the right-wing populist agenda. 

The former head of Breitbart News was largely seen as the highest-ranking proponent for the nationalist and nativist strains of the president's agenda, as well as the enabler of the president's most pugilistic impulses.

Even before Bannon left the White House, there were clear signs that Breitbart was ready to more clearly break with the administration after months of acting as the president's closest media ally online.  

CNN 


Mark Zuckerberg's philanthropic fund just hired its first CFO from PayPal

Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan have hired a chief financial officer for The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the philanthropic fund they created in 2015 to give away the vast majority of their fortune.

The role has been filled by Peggy Abkemeier Alford, a PayPal veteran who was most recently the company's senior VP of human resources. Zuckerberg announced the news on his Facebook page Friday.

Alford will be responsible for managing the books of the fund that Zuckerberg is backing by selling up $1 billion of his Facebook shares per year. He and Priscilla Chan have already made investments in education reform, affordable housing, and a science program dedicated to curing the world's diseases.


15 common social quirks that make you less likable

Being more likable is within your grasp.

All it takes is nixing some of your less-than-desirable social quirks.

With the help of some Quora users and social psychology research, we were able to identify 14 social behaviors that could make you less likable.

You'd be well-advised to avoid these:

Avoiding eye contact

The very first thing people will try to decide about you when they meet you is if they can trust you — and it's fairly hard to like someone if you don't trust them.

As Heidi Grant Halvorson explains in her book "


'Steve is now unchained': Bannon reportedly thinks the Trump administration is a 'sinking ship' and he now plans to 'go nuclear'

Former chief strategist Steve Bannon, who was ousted from the White House on Friday, is reportedly planning his next steps and intends to go "nuclear" with his grievances with the Trump administration.

"Steve is now unchained," one source close to Bannon told The Atlantic Friday. "Fully unchained."

"You have no idea. This is gonna be really f------ bad," another Bannon ally told the magazine.

Bannon himself appeared to confirm the sentiment to Bloomberg Businessweek reporter Joshua Green, who tweeted about the conversation:

"...for Trump against his opponents -- on Capitol Hill, in the media, and in corporate America.” 2/2

— Joshua Green (@JoshuaGreen)

15 solar eclipse maps you need to study before the astronomical event of a century

Total solar eclipse fever is raging as millions prepare for an astronomical event that hasn't cut across the US in 99 years.

On August 21, the moon will slide in front of the sun and cast a dark, moving shadow on America. Not every location will see the solar eclipse at the same time, however, or witness the same phenomena — including totality, which is when the moon fully blocks the sun to reveal the star's ghost-like corona.


Bitcoin is more valuable than gold — but nowhere near as stable

Bitcoin has had its ups and downs since its introduction in 2009, but it's been on a rocket-ship ride of late. On Sunday, it surpassed the $4,000 mark for the first time.

Some investors consider bitcoin a safe haven that's comparable to gold. Like gold, the digital currency isn't tied to one country or central bank. When a particular country experiences a political or economic crisis, its national currency can often take a nosedive; it's global nature and usage make bitcoin more insulated from such problems. 

In fact, the cyber currency, like gold, can benefit from crises and uncertainty. Gold and bitcoin surged 4% and 3%, respectively, after Donald Trump won the election. And some investors are linking the recent spike in bitcoin's value to the escalating war of words between Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un over the latter's missiles and nuclear program.


Bitcoin is more valuable than gold — but nowhere near as stable

Bitcoin has had its ups and downs since its introduction in 2009, but it's been on a rocket-ship ride of late. On Sunday, it surpassed the $4,000 mark for the first time.

Some investors consider bitcoin a safe haven that's comparable to gold. Like gold, the digital currency isn't tied to one country or central bank. When a particular country experiences a political or economic crisis, its national currency can often take a nosedive; it's global nature and usage make bitcoin more insulated from such problems. 

In fact, the cyber currency, like gold, can benefit from crises and uncertainty. Gold and bitcoin surged 4% and 3%, respectively, after Donald Trump won the election. And some investors are linking the recent spike in bitcoin's value to the escalating war of words between Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un over the latter's missiles and nuclear program.