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Google has been hit with a record-breaking €2.4 billion fine by the EU over its antitrust case (GOOG)

LONDON — Google has been hit with a record-breaking fine of €2.4 billion ($2.7 billion, or £2.1 billion) by European regulators.

You can read the full statement from the European Commission here »

The European institution accused the Californian technology giant of abusing its dominant position and promoting its own shopping service in its search results over those of its competitors.

Competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager brought formal charges against Google in 2015.


Google has been hit with a record-breaking €2.4 billion fine by the EU over its antitrust case (GOOG)

LONDON — Google has been hit with a record-breaking fine of €2.4 billion ($2.7 billion, or £2.1 billion) by European regulators.

You can read the full statement from the European Commission here »

The European institution accused the Californian technology giant of abusing its dominant position and promoting its own shopping service in its search results over those of its competitors.

Competition commissioner Margrethe Vestager brought formal charges against Google in 2015.


What it's like to work as a 'budtender' in the legal marijuana industry

Coffee shops have baristas. Bars have bartenders. And marijuana retailers have "budtenders."

An estimated 30,000 Americans work in legal marijuana dispensaries, with a significant portion of those retail employees assisting customers at point of sale. Budtenders have an intimate knowledge of the products sold and can make recommendations based on customer preferences — whether they prefer smoking or vaping, for example, or whether they want to get high while partying or binge-watching TV.

With marijuana legalization at the state level on the rise, there's been a growing demand for people to fill these entry-level jobs, LA Weekly reported in May.


COWEN: We counted at least 7 retail companies that can't get eaten up by Amazon (AMZN, COST, WFM, ROST, WMT, TJX, TIF, LVMH, BID)

Amazon spread its reach further into the retail industry on Friday when it announced its jaw-dropping acquisition of Whole Foods for $13.7 billion.

The market's instant reaction — Amazon's shares rallied while those of its competitors tumbled — sent a clear message: Investors are bullish on Amazon's success in the delicate business of fresh-food delivery, and they're worried about its effect on established grocers like Target and Walmart.

But at least seven retail companies' stocks are "un-Amazon-able," according to a note on Monday from Oliver Chen, a senior equity research analyst at Cowen:


16 photos that show the evolution of American gay pride celebrations over four decades

American cities and towns — big and small — are celebrating Pride month, which is meant to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall Riots.

Since then, LGBT rights have come a long way. The Supreme Court passed marriage equality. "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," was repealed. Oregon elected the nation's first openly bisexual governor. Cultural icons like Ellen DeGeneres, Caitlyn Jenner, and RuPaul Charles have started national conversations about what it means to be queer.

At the same time, many in the LGBT community


9 important foods you aren't eating that you should be this summer

Sure, you know one of the best ways to improve your diet is to cut back on red meat and sweets.

But what about the things you can add to your diet for improved health? The items on this list might not be popular yet among Americans, but they're all either good for your health or beneficial for the planet.

Plus, many of them make great additions to a summer meal — either in salads or on the grill.

Breadfruit.

Breadfruit is found throughout regions with hot, sunny, moist climates, such as the Pacific Islands. The football-sized fruit is covered in prickly, geometric-patterned skin. When hacked open, it resembles a giant kiwi, and the flesh inside is whitish yellow.

Some have called breadfruit "


Facebook is fighting hate speech with the husband of murdered MP Jo Cox (FB)

Facebook is taking steps to try and eradicate racist and terrorist speech from its service.

It's launched the "Online Civil Courage Initiative" (OCCI) in the UK, giving funding and training to organisations which are trying to tackle hate speech. The initiative is already live in Germany and France.

For its UK effort, Facebook has enlisted the help of Brendan Cox, the husband of Jo Cox, an MP who was attacked and killed in West Yorkshire last year. Brendan Cox now runs a charitable foundation in his wife's name.

The other launch partners comprise various community groups — the Jewish-focused Community Security Trust, the anti-Islamophobia group Tell MAMA, and Imams Online.


Farfetch CEO on Brexit: 'Our biggest concern is talent'

LONDON — The founder of British/Portuguese luxury e-commerce business Farfetch, which raised $397 million on Thursday, says he is 100% committed to keeping operations in the UK but is concerned about hiring post-Brexit.

José Neves told Business Insider: "Personally, and this is a personal opinion, not a company view, Brexit is negative. It will create problems for businesses. In our case, our biggest concern is talent.

"We have a big percentage of our team who are from the European Union and other countries. That's what makes London such a great city. Brexit was definitely a move towards more controls in terms of immigration. That will affect the ability to attract talent. This is something that I think the government should really keep in mind."


Farfetch CEO on Brexit: 'Our biggest concern is talent'

LONDON — The founder of British/Portuguese luxury e-commerce business Farfetch, which raised $397 million on Thursday, says he is 100% committed to keeping operations in the UK but is concerned about hiring post-Brexit.

José Neves told Business Insider: "Personally, and this is a personal opinion, not a company view, Brexit is negative. It will create problems for businesses. In our case, our biggest concern is talent.

"We have a big percentage of our team who are from the European Union and other countries. That's what makes London such a great city. Brexit was definitely a move towards more controls in terms of immigration. That will affect the ability to attract talent. This is something that I think the government should really keep in mind."


10 things in tech you need to know today (AAPL, FB)

Good morning! Here is the tech news you need to know this Friday.

1. Uber employees are conflicted over Travis Kalanick's resignation. Over 1,000 have petitioned for his return.

2. Tesla is planning on creating its own proprietary music-streaming service, Recode first reported. Tesla CEO Elon Musk is in talks with major labels about creating a streaming service that would come bundled in all Tesla vehicles, according to the report.

3.