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I played the addictive new game Slither.io and now I get why it's topping the App Store

Despite having a middling 3.5 star rating on the App Store, Slither.io has routinely unseated Snapchat as the No. 1 free app in the App Store since launching earlier this month.

Curious to see what all the buzz was about, I decided to give the game a try, and after only a couple of days I completely understand why everyone is hooked.

There's a lot going on in this simple-looking package, and despite running into some technical hiccups — the game can lag heavily at times — I doubt Slither.io will be leaving my home screen anytime soon.


The woman who was almost Yahoo's CEO says the company has become 'mediocre' and needs a new owner (YHOO)

There was a time when Sue Decker was a star executive and shoo-in candidate for the CEO job at Yahoo.

But a number of decisions, including her role in rejecting Microsoft's buyout offer, derailed her reputation. Eventually, she left the company after Yahoo chose Carol Bartz over her as CEO in 2009.

Still, Decker remains a respected business executive, and helps some of the largest companies, including Intel, Costco, and Berkshire Hathaway, make better decisions by sitting on their boards.

Yahoo's not one of the companies Decker's involved with anymore. But she was still able to provide some advice on the bealeaguered internet giant in a CNBC interview on Friday.


Facebook or Google? Here's the difference between working at 2 of the best employers in America

If you're faced with the decision of whether you should accept a job at Facebook or Google, congratulations — you are one of the privileged few.

Both employers rank in the top five on this year's list of the 50 best companies to work for in America, based on exclusive data from PayScale. And both are extremely competitive in their quest to hire the best and the brightest.

Once you've passed the intense interview process at each respective company, a number of awesome perks, great compensation, and most likely extreme contentment in your new job await you — but which job do you choose?


The most powerful machine on Earth was just halted by a tiny weasel

The largest and most powerful atom smasher on the planet has been taken offline. And it's all thanks to a little weasel.

According to internal documents, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, a 27-kilometer underground ring used to collide particles at nearly the speed of light, is experiencing some issues.

“I can confirm that we had some issues overnight with electrical trouble,” CERN spokesperson Arnaud Marsollier told New Scientist. “We suspect it might be due to a small animal.”

The culprit, a fatally curious weasel, was


15 things you probably didn't know you could do with Facebook's super-popular chat app (FB)

More than 900 million people use Messenger, Facebook's chat product, every month.

To keep people coming back, the company has been juicing up Messenger's capabilities, turning it into a platform that extends beyond just chatting to things like getting news or hailing a ride. 

Here's everything you need to know to make Messenger as useful as possible:

First things first: if you want to boycott the main Facebook app but still use Messenger, it's possible to make an account using only your phone number. Just download the app or go to Messenger.com to sign up.

Facebook first introduced this capability last summer. 

Similarly, you can access Messenger on desktop without going to Facebook.com. If you're finding ...

Women are having a profound new relationship…with their smartphones

If you are a woman and you love your smartphone, you are not alone.

Marketing startup Influence Central interviewed 500 women about how they use their smartphone, a redux of the same survey they did in 2002.

And the results show that women are having a love-affair-type relationship with these devices, using them in both predictable, and surprising, new ways.

Telephone landlines have become a dying breed: Only 46% of homes surveyed had a central home phone, compared to 65% in 2012. That's on par with the national average: 45% of Americans don't have home phones anymore, the CDC says.

Source: CDC

Families own on average 2.6 smartphones, one for each parent and often one for kids. Women are more attached to their phones than their purses. 48% of...

Groupon tumbles after weak revenue guidance (GRPN)

Groupon shares fell by as much as 17% on Friday after the company released revenue projections that were weaker than analysts expected. 

In its earnings results Thursday, Groupon said it expects 2016 sales of $2.75 billion to $3.05 billion. That fell short of the average estimate for $3.01 billion. The low end of the forecast was less than the weakest analyst estimate of $2.09 billion, according to Bloomberg. 

Groupon also reported a first-quarter loss of $49.1 million, or $0.08 per share — four times the loss it recorded a year ago.


BuzzFeed's European general manager Kate Burns is out

BuzzFeed's European general manager Kate Burns has left the digital media publisher a little over a year after she joined the company.

Quite why Burns left the company is not yet clear.

A spokesperson for BuzzFeed said it was Burns' decision to leave. The search is on for her replacement.

In a statement, BuzzFeed said: "Over the last year, Kate has been an integral part of stabilizing and growing our business in the UK and Europe. We are grateful for the leadership role she has played and wish her the very best in the future."

Burns sent Business Insider this statement: "The European business is doing exceptionally well thanks to the incredible job my team have done in the last year. I know they will go from strength to strength. I am very sad to leave, and I wish them all the best, and I will miss them very much."

There are competing theories swirling around the context of her departure:

Sources close to t...

Why Apple stumbled this week (AAPL)

This week's crop of tech earnings turned out pretty well, with Amazon, Facebook, and LinkedIn all posting better-than-expected results.

But there was one big exception: Apple. Not only did Apple report its first quarterly revenue and profit decline (vs the previous year) since 2003 — which everyone was expecting — it also missed Wall Street's expectations and downgraded Q2 guidance. CEO Tim Cook blamed the larger economic picture, and said "the smartphone market, as you know, is currently not growing."

This chart from Morgan Stanley's Tech Hardware Pulse, based on numbers from IDC, shows the starkness of the slowdown.


This stat shows why Netflix should be afraid of Amazon (NFLX)

Netflix might be the king of content in the streaming video world, but there's one gargantuan advantage Amazon has in the space: it doesn’t actually have to make money on its Netflix competitor, Prime Video.

Amazon CFO Brian Olsavsky highlighted the value of video to Amazon during its earnings call on Thursday. He said that Amazon is going to “significantly increase [its] content spend” on its video offerings because the company is seeing better engagement and conversions from Prime members who use the video service.

In plain English: Prime Video helps Amazon make money in other ways.

Here’s a simple example. In a recent survey conducted by CutCableToday (independent of its website), Amazon Prime subscribers were found to be 10 times as likely to rent or buy movies from Amazon Instant Video than non-Prime members.

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